Squirrel!

Squirrel SQL Client that is…    I’m getting ready to do some app/dev against the UCCX database, and I needed a nice SQL browser to poke around with. Squirrel!      Check out the following URL for a setup doc.  You’ll find the necessary informix drivers in the Program Files X86wfavvid_1051lib folder.

And use this doc for a setup guide

https://supportforums.cisco.com/sites/default/files/legacy/5/6/6/41665-SQuirrel%20SQL%20Client%20Setup.pdf

A tip for dealing with prompt recording in UCCX

We all have prompt recorder apps.   Some of us even build elaborate ‘Administrative IVRs’ to allow our callers to control IVR call flow behaviors (often building in a prompt recording mechanism).   This is all fine and good – and I’m a huge fan of it!  I’ve always had a concern, however, with giving access to a ‘prompt recorder’ cart-blanche to an end user. What if they overwrite a prompt that they shouldn’t be able to access?   I’ve hypothesized of several ways to deal with this issue over time (create a database and assign permissions to individual prompt files, create a menu structure that just updates a static prompt rather than letting the user specify it) but none of the solutions made me happy…. until today.

Like most ‘light bulb moments’, sometimes the most obvious solution is the exact thing that your tunnel vision prevents you from seeing.   Let me tell you about mine today.

I name my prompts numerically, and the numbering scheme relates to the application ID, which is unique for each application on the platform.   So for Application #6, the first prompt is numbered 601, and I leave available the entire range of 6xx numbers, so we’re good up to 699 – that’s the glue that makes this SO easy…. When coding my administrative IVR for a given application, why not validate the prompt range – since the relationship exists already? Just a snippet of what this might look like in practice…

[code]

WhichPrompt:
         promptnumber = Get Digit String (--Triggering Contact--)
            Successful                          
               Set promptNumINT = promptnumber
               If (promptNumINT < 600) Then
                  True
                     Goto WhichPrompt
                  False
               If (promptNumINT > 699) Then
                  True
                     Goto WhichPrompt
                  False
               saypromptnumber = Create Generated Prompt spelling (promptnumber)

[/code]

It’s so simple, yet has eluded me for so long. And as usual, it’s like ‘why didn’t I think of that before?’ – Just validate that the prompt being selected is within the ‘range’ associated with the application, and you’re golden. No more overwriting prompts that you’ve got no business messing with.

Granted, this strategy relies on my numeric, application-relative prompt naming convention, and it assumes that you’re going to create a unique administrative IVR counterpart to each production IVR (which I often do anyway) … but it works.   So that’s my light bulb moment, and tip for the day.  Enjoy, and happy scripting!

So what’s with this ninja thing?

Lets call him the mascot, for all intents and purposes.  I want to try and be more like a ninja.  Now lets not go equating the word ‘ninja’ to ‘expert’ – that’s not what this is about at all.   A ninja, first and foremost, is a student.  He is constantly learning and practicing his art.  My art form is collaboration, and I’ve committed myself to being a life-long learner.  Hence, the collab ninja :)

Re-Branding is hard work!

I’ve been using the @ciscovoicedude identity on Twitter for years, but recently I’ve found that (no big surprise here), it’s not just about voice anymore. I’m not just a voice dude, I’m a Collaboration Dude! So after a few months in the making, I’m ready to take on (fully) my new identity as @Collab_Ninja – the website www.collab.ninja, the new twitter handle, the new avatar, all of it. I may be housekeeping some of my old and unrelated tweets, etc (there’s a lot of garbage fluff), but moving forward you can expect to see more on collaboration technology, with a new invigorated spirit. No need to fear, the same old snark will still be there. Welcome aboard!

Be the dumbest person in the room

Working in IT, you run into people with all sorts of ego. It’s hard not to develop one yourself. One lesson I learned a long time ago was that you need to be the dumbest person in the room. Surround yourself by intelligent people, mentors, brilliant minds, and creative thinkers. These are the people who will raise you up, and sculpt you. While I’ve done a lot of teaching over the years, be it in the classroom or via CBT, I’m not a teacher – I’m a learner. Be the dumbest person in the room, and I guarantee you will start learning simply by osmosis! That’s my short advice for the night. Peace out!